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Carnarvon Gorge

The Heart of Beauty. The wind, water and weather have been carving this spectacular gorge for millions of years. The gorge was gazetted as a National Park by the Queensland Government in 1932.

Highlights

Spot birds, reptiles, frogs and mammals as you wander through the beauty of the Gorge. Many of the fauna found in the park are not found any further west, the park being their distribution limit.

Meander through the 20+ km of maintained bushwalking tracks and trails. You will find a grading and distance to suit all skill levels.

Cool off in the Rock Pool swimming hole. To protect the fragile aquatic ecosystem, the Rock Pool is the only place within the gorge where swimming is permitted. Keep an eye out for a turtle or platypus who may just join you on your dip!

Visit one of the oldest art galleries on earth. Here on the sandstone walls of the gorge, you will find some of the best examples of stencil art in Australia.
Join the knowledgeable and entertaining rangers on a night safari, to watch the park’s nocturnal creatures.

Best time of year to visit

Carnarvon Gorge is open all year, weather permitting of course. Autumn and winter are popular times, providing cooler weather for comfortable walking and clearer lookout views. Fires during summer and spring can result in a haze covering your hard earned view.

Climate

Temperatures in Carnarvon Gorge can vary widely throughout the year, regularly climbing above 35 ℃ during the long, hot summer. Summer also sees an increase in rain and storm activity, flash floods can occur at any time. Walking in the early morning is recommended during the summer months.

Winter day time temperatures are mild and dry, however the temperature often dips to zero or below overnight. If planning a multi-day hike during the winter months, ensure you have adequate provisions and supplies.

Carnarvon Gorge – The Heart of Beauty

The wind, water and weather have been carving this spectacular gorge for millions of years. The gorge was gazetted as a National Park by the Queensland Government when a pastoral lease of 65,000 hectares expired in 1932. Testament to the Government’s ongoing commitment to the preservation and protection of natural ecosytems, additional land has been added to the original area, with the national park now covering 298,000 hectares.

This lush, desert oasis is due to the artesian fed waterways throughout the park, some of which have never been known to cease flowing.

There are a range of self-directed or organised activities waiting for you in Carnarvon Gorge. Pop into the Visitor Centre on arrival for all the information, maps and advice you will need to truly appreciate this magical place.

Tours that visit Carnarvon Gorge

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