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Charlotte Plains

If you love the outdoors, Charlotte Plains has something for everyone at every time of the year. Cozy up by the campfire during winter, or explore all the property has to offer in summer.

Highlights

Soak your weary bones in cast-iron bath, filled with warm, mineral-rich waters drawn from artesian bores deep beneath the ground.

Begin to understand the joy and heartbreak of working a sheep and cattle station in this, often inhospitable, environment.

Enjoy wide open skies – bluer than blue during the day and millions of stars twinkling over you at night.

Gaze in wonder at the breath-taking variety of wildlife, bird life and wildflowers.

Learn the art of camp oven cooking and relish in tasting the mouth-watering creations.

Unroll a swag and sleep under the stars, or in the historic shearing shed.

Best time of year to visit

If you love the outdoors, Charlotte Plains has something for everyone at every time of the year. Cozy up by the campfire during winter, or explore all the property has to offer in summer. There is no ‘worst’ time to enjoy the warm welcome you will receive.

Climate

Dry, clear, sunny days await throughout the year. There are few rainy days which means you will find plenty of sunshine. The low humidity and regular breeze helps to keep the high summer temperatures comfortable and easily managed.

Charlotte Plains – Million Star Delight

Charlotte Plains is a working sheep/cattle station located 54 km east of Cunnamulla. The original pastoral lease of 385,000 acres was granted to Scottish brothers Archibald and Peter McDonald in the 1860s. Both brothers are buried in the station’s cemetery.

In 1925, the property was purchased by A.B. (Bunny) Nagel and has remained in the family ever since. Around this time, much of the property was resumed, resulting in a decrease to the current size of around 72,000 acres and the creation of six new stations. As the current size is equal to half the size of Singapore, the sheer enormity of the original property is truly mind-boggling!

Sheep numbers in the early 1900s rose as high as 100,000, with records of 67,000 being shorn in the 26-stand shearing shed in 1914.

As a result of the recent but long-running drought, the station has experienced a steady decline in sheep numbers to the current level of approximately 8,000. However, the unwavering optimism of those who call this country home is evident in their commitment to increasing those numbers.

Tours that visit Charlotte Plains

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